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Misfit Dahlias

SANTA CLAUS

SANTA CLAUS

Regular price $10.00 USD
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BB-ID-BI 3115

Form: Informal Decorative  

Size: Small 4-6"

Color: Bicolor Red and White

Hybridizer: Harold Miller 

Introduction Year: 1983

December 25, 2023 Misfit Monday Post: Merry Misfit Monday Christmas! The only obvious choice to highlight today is the stunning variety SANTA CLAUS! Which is a small sized informal decorative bicolor of red and white. Aptly named after Jolly Old Saint Nicholas. And fun fact there is also a MRS. SANTA CLAUS which is the orange and white sport of SANTA CLAUS. Both of these cultivars were hybridized by Washington resident Harold Miller, The OG SANTA CLAUS hit the market in 1983 and MRS. SANTA CLAUS 10 years later in 1994. There is also a solid orange sport seen in my last few pictures but not sure it was ever named. SANTA CLAUS is Harold's most popular introduction but he also bred many more, including the "Puget" prefix dahlias. And Harold Miller is quit famous himself among the Dahlia world. Harold was one of the founding members of Puget Sound Dahlia Society and the Federation of Northwest Dahlia Growers. He wrote the 1st version of Dahlias: A Monthly Guide and was one of the 1st editors of Dahlias of Today. He also was an active dahlia show competitor and Senior Judge. But his real shining role was being a teacher of dahlia judges and anyone who wanted to learn about dahlias. When he sold his property to the Burtons in the 90s it came with a membership to PSDA and all his dahlia knowledge, which helped them to create the "Stillwater" line of dahlias. Sadly Harold passed away in October of 2007, but he was not forgotten, in 2011 the Federation included Harold in the Hall of Fame for all his work in the dahlia community. Today his memory lives on through his dahlias and all that knew him. Dick Parshall told me recently he was one of the greats and always grew 1st year seedlings so he had to live long enough to see them bloom, which he did.

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